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ALL YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT CLASSIC RALEIGH CHOPPERS BUT DIDN'T KNOW WHO TO ASK

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The end of an era for Raleigh.
122 words
29 November 2002
Evening News - Scotland
(c) The Scotsman Publications Ltd.
BICYCLE maker Raleigh has ended production in Nottingham, bringing to an end more than 100 years of history in the city.
The firm, which created classic models like the Chopper and the Grifter, is switching assembly to the Far East, with the loss of about 280 jobs.
Phillip Darnton, chairman of Raleigh UK, said: "The average length of service here is around 21 years and the average age of workers is 52 or 53 years old. For most people it has been their working life."
The firm announced plans to switch construction work to factories in Vietnam, Thailand and Sri Lanka in March to cut costs. Raleigh will retain distribution and design centres in Nottingham.
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Last bicycles come off Raleigh line.
342 words
29 November 2002
Birmingham Post
(c) 2002 Birmingham Post & Mail Ltd
Bicycle maker Raleigh was yesterday closing down its production line in Nottingham bringing to a end more than 100 years of history in the city.
The firm, which created classic models like the Chopper and the Grifter, will switch assembly to the Far East, with the loss of about 280 jobs.
Phillip Darnton, chairman of Raleigh UK, said: 'The average length of service here is around 21 years and the average age of workers is 52 or 53. For most people it has been their working life.
'We've tried to explain our position and people understand that the decision is to do with worldwide economics, but everyone is nostalgic.'
Bicycles have been assembled by the factory in Nottingham for 117 years and for 50 years at the current site in Triumph Road.
The firm announced plans to switch construction work to factories in Vietnam, Thailand and Sri Lanka in March in a drive to cut costs, but the company will retain distribution and design centres in Nottingham.
As the last model rolled off the production line, Mr Darnton said: 'I asked a worker how she managed to come back day after day for 25 years, putting stickers on bikes.
'She said it is because the firm is like family. It certainly has that homespun and unfashionable feel. 'Recently I was introduced to a couple who had met in our wheel shop in 1938 and later married. They had a combined total of 101 years service.'
In addition to bikes, the firm also aided the military in both World Wars by producing munitions.
'Though people will look to the past today, I am convinced this action will help the company to continue long into the future,' said Mr Darnton.
'Next year we will have 500,000 bikes produced for us in the Far East to a Raleigh standard, from our designs and at a much reduced cost.'
About 200 workers will keep their posts, transferring to distribution and design sites in Eastwood and in Sherwood Park.
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On your bike Raleigh move to the Far East costs 280 jobs.
165 words
29 November 2002
The Guardian
(c) 2002
Bicycle maker Raleigh yesterday closed its production line in Nottingham bringing to a end more than 100 years of history in the city. The firm will switch assembly to the Far East, with the loss of about 280 jobs.
Phillip Darnton, the chairman of Raleigh UK, said: "The average length of service here is around 21 years and the average age of workers is 52 or 53 years old. For most people it has been their working life.
"We've tried to explain our position and people understand that the decision is to do with worldwide economics, but everyone is nostalgic today."
Bicycles have been assembled by the factory in Nottingham for 117 years.
The firm announced plans to switch construction work to factories in Vietnam, Thailand and Sri Lanka in March in a drive to cut costs, but the company will retain distribution and design centres in Nottingham. - PA
Photographs: Page One.
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Raleigh's UK factory closes.
168 words
28 November 2002
Evening Times
(c) 2002 SMG Newspapers Ltd
Bicycle maker Raleigh was today closing down its production line in Nottingham, bringing an end to over 100 years of history in the city.
The firm, that created classic models such as the Chopper and the Grifter, will move assembly to the Far East, with the loss of about 280 jobs.
Phillip Darnton, chairman of Raleigh UK, said: "The average length of service here is 21 years and the average age of workers is 52 or 53.
"For most people it has been their working life.
"We've tried to explain our position and people understand that the decision is to do with global economics, but everyone is nostalgic today."
Bicycles have been assembled by the factory in Nottingham for 117 years and for 50 years at the current site in Triumph Road.
The firm announced the plans to move construction work to factories in Vietnam, Thailand and Sri Lanka in March, but the firm will retain distribution and design centres in Nottingham.
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.Last Day At Raleigh Site.
108 words
28 November 2002
Nottingham Evening Post
(c) 2002 Nottingham Evening Post
The bicycle firm is moving to Eastwood after selling the site in Triumph Road, Lenton, to the University of Nottingham.
The deal was done in the summer and Raleigh plans to operate at its new site from January.
It was announced earlier this year that its bikes would be made abroad.
The decision means nearly 300 workers will lose their jobs.
Raleigh said it will continue to distribute cycles in Britain with its fleet of purpose-built vehicles.
The new site will provide employment for about 110 permanent staff, mainly in marketing, sales and distribution, as well as the buying and engineering teams.
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Raleigh shuts factory gates.
By MARK PATTERSON.
418 words
28 November 2002
Nottingham Evening Post
(c) 2002 Nottingham Evening Post
The final 280 employees at the company in Triumph Road, whose 'Made in Nottingham' signs have adorned millions of bikes sold all over the world, were planning to mark the end of an era by partying nostalgically into the night.
Raleigh, which was founded by Frank Bowden in 1887, will retain a 13-acre design, warehouse and distribution facility in Eastwood.
But all manufacturing of parts and the final assembly of bikes will now take place in Vietnam, Sri Lanka and Thailand.
At its height in the 1970s, Raleigh employed 8,000 people and turned out as many as four million bicycles a year, including the famous Chopper.
The sight of thousands of workers spilling into the streets of Lenton when their shift ended was as much a part of Nottingham life as Boots, Player's and lace.
But over the last 20 years Raleigh has been unable to compete with manufacturing costs in the Far East.
On top of that, senior managers also had to weather a disastrous bout of ownership by the US-based Derby Cycle Corporation.
Although foreign ownership ended with a management buy-out last year, Raleigh announced in March that it was finally ending all bicycle assembly at Triumph Road. The last parts to be manufactured at the factory were steel bike frames in 1999.
Of the final 280 workers, around 30 are moving to work in Eastwood. On Tuesday, another 30 were offered jobs at the Nottingham-based fantasy gaming giants Games Workshop.
Despite the closure of the Raleigh factory, managing director Phillip Darnton promised that the Raleigh name would "live forever".
Factories in the Far East, where the cost of making Raleigh's bikes are as much as 25% lower than they are in Nottingham, will be producing half a million bicycles for the UK market.
After Raleigh staff complete their move to Eastwood, Mr Darnton will stand down and be replaced by John Spon-Smith, the former MD of parts and accessories. The Triumph Road site will be bulldozed and developed by the University of Nottingham.
City council leader Coun Brian Parbutt said: "It's a sad day for Nottingham. Raleigh has played a big part in manufacturing and the lives of a lot of people. What the closure represents is the end of a chapter in the story of traditional manufacturing in Nottingham.
"Today, the people spilling out onto the streets are from Capital One rather than the Raleighs of the world."
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Raleigh's factory to be homes.
304 words
19 November 2002
Nottingham Evening Post
(c) 2002 Nottingham Evening Post
Plans have been put forward by Metropolitan Housing Trust to turn the former Gambles Factory building in Raleigh Street into 28 apartments.
It also includes a proposal to build a new seven-storey building adjacent to it to accommodate a further 32 apartments, taking its total to 60.
The proposal has been put forward after the building, in a conservation area, was bought by the Housing Trust for more than ?.25m earlier thisyear.
It was the original home of Raleigh Bicycles and has a plaque on the front to commemorate this.
Planning officers are expected to recommend approval for proposal at a meeting of the city council development control committee tomorrow.
It will be subject to a contribution being made by the applicant to affordable housing in the area.
In a report to the committee, Alison Dudley, team leader in development control, said: "The development will bring a vacant and deterioratingbuilding with historical amenity value back into use and assist in the regeneration of the Gamble Street area.
"Furthermore, both the conversion and new build elements of the scheme are appropriate to the area's Conservation status." Deal done on offices
Robert Maxey, of Nottingham agents Nattrass Giles, acting for of Agrovista UK, has completed the letting of 12,000 sq ft of offices at Cambridge House, Stapleford.
The Nottingham Road, building enjoys a generous parking and excellent access to the A52 and Junction 25 of the M1.
It has been taken by Enterprise Rent-A-Car, which is relocating its East Midlands headquarters as part of an expansion plan.
The company, which is the largest car rental firm in North America, started in the UK in 1994 and has rapidly expanded.
It has 193 locations across the UK and employs over 1,500 staff.
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 2002 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

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